Hooven Bog purchased for conservation!

WE DID IT!!!!!!!!!

THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO PURCHASE HOOVEN BOG AND THE 8 ACRES NEXT TO IT FOR AN INTERPRETIVE CENTER. This will allow people to learn about the bog without actually walking around in it.

Future generations will be able to visit this ancient site and learn more about our green earth and how important it is to take care of it.

We owe a deep debt of gratitude to our administration, Snohomish County Executive, John Lovick, and his Deputy Executive, Mark Ericks. Without them and their passion for the environment, this would have never happened. The bog may have been ruined by development.

Your continued support played a huge part in this great event. There were between 20 and 30 people at the hearing. Mark Ericks received over 150 letters of support. This had to have mattered in the vote by the council!

We hope you come to celebrate with us this Sunday the 27th at the Brightwater Treatment Plant community center. Click here for directions and more information.

Kirkland’s Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance proposes residential stormwater audit

Pacific Northwest residents typically treat surface water as a problem to be solved. They route runoff away from their property as quickly as possible: Out of sight, out of mind, problem solved. However, in their haste to remain dry, residents are giving away a valuable resource. The proposed plan looks at how surface water works on a given site and give ideas and solutions for that site, to help save money and solve surface water issues for that site and the local area.

Read more….

Edmonds Perrinville Creek parcel preserved for now

Photo from myedmondsnews.com

Council preserves parcel of urban forest

By Laura Daniali | Mar 20, 2014 – Edmonds Beacon
The Edmonds City Council will forgo the sale of a city parcel of land after an outpour of public opposition to the potential loss of the forested area….
Some councilmembers received emails and other feedback from residents and members of Washington Conservation Voters, Sierra Club and Sno-King Watershed Council.

Read more…http://edmondsbeacon.villagesoup.com/p/council-preserves-parcel-of-urban-forest/1144107

Bothell Horse Creek Daylighting

After decades underground, over 1/2 mile of Horse Creek will be daylighted through a new mixed-use urban neighborhood, as part of city of Bothell’s Downtown Revitalization Plan.  This is great news, as the original plan for the redevelopment was to keep the stream in a pipe.  It currently runs in a pipe under/along Bothell Way NE from about the 20000 block until it exits into the Sammamish River at the Park at Bothell Landing.

Read more in the Bothell Reporter

And on the site of the landscape architect, Gaynor Inc

Also on the City of Bothell website

Protecting Puget Sound with Urban Planning

Rebecca Ponzio, Puget Sound Policy Specialist, Washington Environmental Council

Long-term city planning doesn’t typically make front page news, but it is essential for thoughtful, integrated use of the landscape. The City of Burien is doing just that through a regional stormwater management system for the Northeast Redevelopment Area (NERA), an approximately 100 acre package of land located to the north of the third runway at Sea-Tac International Airport. Burien is on the front lines of integrating improved land uses with low-impact development techniques, a trail network for transportation and recreation, and stormwater facilities along the Miller Creek corridor.

Read more…

http://wecprotects.org/issues-campaigns/puget-sound/protecting-puget-sound-with-urban-planning

 

Hooven Bog purchased for conservation!

WE DID IT!!!!!!!!!

THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO PURCHASE HOOVEN BOG AND THE 8 ACRES NEXT TO IT FOR AN INTERPRETIVE CENTER. This will allow people to learn about the bog without actually walking around in it.

Future generations will be able to visit this ancient site and learn more about our green earth and how important it is to take care of it.

We owe a deep debt of gratitude to our administration, Snohomish County Executive, John Lovick, and his Deputy Executive, Mark Ericks. Without them and their passion for the environment, this would have never happened. The bog may have been ruined by development.

Your continued support played a huge part in this great event. There were between 20 and 30 people at the hearing. Mark Ericks received over 150 letters of support. This had to have mattered in the vote by the council!

We hope you come to celebrate with us this Sunday the 27th at the Brightwater Treatment Plant community center. Click here for directions and more information.

Kirkland’s Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance proposes residential stormwater audit

Pacific Northwest residents typically treat surface water as a problem to be solved. They route runoff away from their property as quickly as possible: Out of sight, out of mind, problem solved. However, in their haste to remain dry, residents are giving away a valuable resource. The proposed plan looks at how surface water works on a given site and give ideas and solutions for that site, to help save money and solve surface water issues for that site and the local area.

Read more….

Edmonds Perrinville Creek parcel preserved for now

Photo from myedmondsnews.com

Council preserves parcel of urban forest

By Laura Daniali | Mar 20, 2014 – Edmonds Beacon
The Edmonds City Council will forgo the sale of a city parcel of land after an outpour of public opposition to the potential loss of the forested area….
Some councilmembers received emails and other feedback from residents and members of Washington Conservation Voters, Sierra Club and Sno-King Watershed Council.

Read more…http://edmondsbeacon.villagesoup.com/p/council-preserves-parcel-of-urban-forest/1144107

Bothell Horse Creek Daylighting

After decades underground, over 1/2 mile of Horse Creek will be daylighted through a new mixed-use urban neighborhood, as part of city of Bothell’s Downtown Revitalization Plan.  This is great news, as the original plan for the redevelopment was to keep the stream in a pipe.  It currently runs in a pipe under/along Bothell Way NE from about the 20000 block until it exits into the Sammamish River at the Park at Bothell Landing.

Read more in the Bothell Reporter

And on the site of the landscape architect, Gaynor Inc

Also on the City of Bothell website

Protecting Puget Sound with Urban Planning

Rebecca Ponzio, Puget Sound Policy Specialist, Washington Environmental Council

Long-term city planning doesn’t typically make front page news, but it is essential for thoughtful, integrated use of the landscape. The City of Burien is doing just that through a regional stormwater management system for the Northeast Redevelopment Area (NERA), an approximately 100 acre package of land located to the north of the third runway at Sea-Tac International Airport. Burien is on the front lines of integrating improved land uses with low-impact development techniques, a trail network for transportation and recreation, and stormwater facilities along the Miller Creek corridor.

Read more…

http://wecprotects.org/issues-campaigns/puget-sound/protecting-puget-sound-with-urban-planning

 

Mushrooms Clean Stormwater

Image by Paul Stamets

Ah, the Garden Giant. He’s a jolly fellow who roams around your garden at night tossing mulch as he merrily skips along, helping your veggies grow lush and tall.

Not quite. The Garden Giant is actually a species of mushroom, scientifically known as Stropharia rugosoannulata, that may hold a key to filtering harmful pollutants from stormwater runoff.

By SARAH STRUNIN click here for more info

 

 

Sno-King Watershed Council

Finished stream restoration- North Seattle - JIm Freese (2)- SnoKingThe Sno-King Watershed Council came about after meetings in Kenmore and Lake Forest Park regarding a stream flowing into Lake Washington.  This stream, designated 08-0056, or known as Tschet Schatl or Little Creek, flows into Lake Washington in Log Boom Park in Kenmore.  These meetings incorporated people from local government and environmental organizations.  At these meetings, Tom Murdoch of the Adopt-A-Stream Foundation suggested the groups band together to work on collective watershed issues, and the Sno-King Watershed Council was born!  The Sno-King Watershed Council is … a group of friends, all connected, working on common goals to improve water quality and restore salmon runs.  What we do: mobilize people for your issues, write letters, provide  links to your website, put you on our collective letterhead, give you more “clout”, share success stories, share data and resources. Our hope is that by sharing expert resources, knowledge, and successes, we can all become stronger and achieve our goals….which are – water safe for our kids to play in, preserving our quality of life, and getting some salmon back in our streams.

Mushrooms Clean Stormwater

Image by Paul Stamets

Ah, the Garden Giant. He’s a jolly fellow who roams around your garden at night tossing mulch as he merrily skips along, helping your veggies grow lush and tall.

Not quite. The Garden Giant is actually a species of mushroom, scientifically known as Stropharia rugosoannulata, that may hold a key to filtering harmful pollutants from stormwater runoff.

By SARAH STRUNIN click here for more info

 

 

Sno-King Watershed Council

Finished stream restoration- North Seattle - JIm Freese (2)- SnoKingThe Sno-King Watershed Council came about after meetings in Kenmore and Lake Forest Park regarding a stream flowing into Lake Washington.  This stream, designated 08-0056, or known as Tschet Schatl or Little Creek, flows into Lake Washington in Log Boom Park in Kenmore.  These meetings incorporated people from local government and environmental organizations.  At these meetings, Tom Murdoch of the Adopt-A-Stream Foundation suggested the groups band together to work on collective watershed issues, and the Sno-King Watershed Council was born!  The Sno-King Watershed Council is … a group of friends, all connected, working on common goals to improve water quality and restore salmon runs.  What we do: mobilize people for your issues, write letters, provide  links to your website, put you on our collective letterhead, give you more “clout”, share success stories, share data and resources. Our hope is that by sharing expert resources, knowledge, and successes, we can all become stronger and achieve our goals….which are – water safe for our kids to play in, preserving our quality of life, and getting some salmon back in our streams.